How Can I Get My Golf Game Into The 80′s?

Find a time machine! Just kidding.

Lots of practice.

Depends on what you’re hitting now?

Sounds like you have some experience, its probably time that a good set of clubs would make a difference.

Make sure your clubs are fitted correctly and maybe getting hooked up to a computer would allow you to see what you are doing right or wrong.

Practice on your swing to maximize on your distance.

If you land on the rough, every time you swing…let’s say a 300 yard driver, even you it as hard as possible, you’re only using 60% of the club’s max distance.

So using a driver in the rough will only give you a max of 180 yards.

As for in the sand, you’re only using 75% potential or 225 yards. Basically you need to do lots of math when using your clubs in order to get your game in the 80s.

Quickest way to shave strokes is to practice your putting and chipping.

These strokes are typically about 50% of your round yet few people practice this as it isn’t as much fun to practice.

Its more fun to go out to the driving range and pound a driver yet you only use this club at the most 15 times per round.

Just be eliminating 3 putts and duffed chips someone who shoots in the 90-100 range can shave probably 6-8 strokes a round.

If you’re shooting in the 80′s you’re obviously a decent golfer. so to shave off the next few strokes instead of working on swing mechanics work on timing and rhythm.

When you think to much about the mechanics of the game you forget about feel.

Practice and persistence

Stop wearing those techno-color plaid pants and orange shirts from the seventies!

The best way to lower your score is practice and more practice.

If you are in the 90′s now, then you can probably hit the ball decent.

So the most important part is working on your short game ie: chippins and putting and shots from 100 yards in. I am a 2 handicapp, and I practice regularly.

When I practice, I spend about 35% on the range, and 65% on the putting and chipping green.

The old saying “drive for show and putt for dough” is very true.

A 3 foot putt is the same on the scorecard as a 300 yard drive.

Instead of trying to make par or birdie on every hole try to play everything as a par five.

5 shots in every hole will get you 90 (5×18=90) now if you figure on par three you can make it in 3 to 4 you will be in the 80′s I hope this made sense! in other words play smart short shots once you get a hang of this you can try to shoot for par and so on. It worked for me I’m sure it will work for you!

You have to make sure you practice the right thing. It’s not about who can hit the most balls.

You can start out with a free lesson by going to http://www.playgolfamerica.com and sign up for a free lesson from a local PGA Pro.

Also go to http://www.pga.com improve your game section. Read the putting tips and mental tips. All of the tips from Rick the PGA’s Instructor on staff are great.

Try to minimize your big numbers, you don’t want to make anything higher than a double bogey, and of course always work on your short game

Score reducing is fun and could give pride to brag about with you mate.

Could get mechanical, too.

My Ex boss a good golfer, retired and tried to pass the pro exam, which he has to hit from the pro tee and not make something like six over in three round of golf.

That’s damn difficult.

To break ninety (that is below 45, 45) you need to hit driver over 250 (at least), then hit a regulation green at least ten holes, meaning good approach.

For the rest you haven’t hit the green in regulation, then must chip it close and make up and down in two, meaning you have to putt well.

Say, only four things you need to improve: Drive far into the faiway, approach on green, chip it in or close to the hole, make lots of two putts. Practice on this. My boss can never make it to the pro. Good luck.

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